Skip to main content
Month
S
M
T
W
T
F
S
Month
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat

CORE SUPPORT

What is Core Support in High School ?

Resource (RSP) Core Support services are specialized academic instructions to support the needs associated with assisting a student with a disability access his or her standards-based curriculum.   All Resource Level (RSP) Special Services students should be in a Core Support Transition Class when they enter high school (9th grade.)  

Core Support Class activities focus on the ITP goals specific to completing high school diploma graduation requirements.  On the IEP these are often the Career Planning, College Planning, Organization or Advocacy goals.  These activities may include:

  • Learning the proper use of online research resources, such as Infinite Campus system and online Newspapers such as The Los Angeles Times and the San Francisco Chronicle.
  • Plans to complete the required 40 Community Service Hours
  • Learning and refining key Office software skills such as how to create an M.L.A. formatted term paper, and a resume, using time-saving built-ins.  Colleges demand and expect document standards such as MLA or APA.
  • Career exploration, such as online Career Interest Surveys.
  • Key announcements such as college fairs, and community service opportunities.  

I try to coordinate with other school resources that may be touching on similar activity, such as academic teachers, school counselors, the career center, and clubs.  This provides reinforcement of the learning in other classes.

Additionally, this class can be the time when staff and teachers work individually with a student on their academic goals.  

RSP services were never intended to be ‘study hall’ or ‘homework period.' RSP services are supposed to be based on the goals derived from the assessed needs of a student.

For all students with IEPs who are high school age special education has the mandate to address transition needs.  There is a tremendous amount of flexibility in how we must address this need.  To ensure Special Services students graduate with a diploma and/or are gainfully employed after graduation, transition activities are at the forefront of ensuring success. We address this need through the Core Support Class providing that daily opportunity.  

Accommodations Versus Modifications

The Difference Between Accommodations & Modifications

Students with an Individualized Education Program (IEP) receive class testing accommodations or modifications. These terms are often used interchangeably and this is incorrect.  They have very different meanings and serve two distinct purposes.  An IEP team and the case manager choose accommodations and modifications that are specific to each student.

What is the difference between accommodations and modifications?

ACCOMMODATIONS alter how a student learns. They do not change what the student is expected to learn. Accommodations describe an alteration of the environment, curriculum format, or equipment that allows an individual with a disability to pursue a regular course of study and complete assigned tasks. Within a classroom, accommodations take the form of physical or environmental changes, such as changing the timing, setting, formatting, response, or presentation of material. For example, the teacher may seat a student easily overwhelmed or distracted away from noisy parts of a classroom; or a student having difficulty reading may listen to an audio recording of the text. Other classroom accommodations may include:

  • Providing a student with extra time to complete assignments.
  • Having breaks during instruction.
  • Using large print books and worksheets.
  • Having sign language interpreters.
  • Using specialized keyboards.

Formal or standardized testing situations may also include accommodations, depending upon the needs of the student. Ideally, a student’s testing accommodations are similar to the accommodations provided in the classroom. Accommodations do not allow altering the scoring of a standardized test or content of the information presented.

MODIFICATIONS describe fundamental changes in the curriculum. They may include altering the standard expectations for a course or assessment, as the student may be unable to learn all of the material.  Within the classroom, modifications include shortening assignments or providing texts that are easier to read. For an elementary student with cognitive impairments in a general education class, assignments might be reduced in number or modified significantly.  When applied to standardize testing, modifications do impact the interpretation of the test results. Additionally, modifications may take the form of an “alternate assessment,” in which a test may not cover the same material as the standard exams.

RESOURCE (RSP) STUDENTS DO NOT HAVE COURSE CONTENT MODIFIED.  

It is important for parents, teachers, and administrators to be aware of the differences between accommodations and modifications when creating educational programs for students. With appropriate accommodations and modifications in place, IEP teams can help set students up for success.

Resources

-ERICA M. ZOLLMAN, 2015 ACCOMMODATIONS & MODIFICATIONS: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

WHAT ARE RESOURCE LEVEL ACCOMMODATIONS?

WHAT ARE RESOURCE LEVEL ACCOMMODATIONS? 

From the discussion above it should be clear that MODIFICATIONS are not appropriate for Resource Level Students.    As an enrollee in a general education class, they are expected to learn the same content and depth of material as their peers.  The material cannot be shortened for them as that is a modification. 

Most RSP students have this accommodation:

Extended time on major projects, tests, and assignments

This is how I explain “Extended time” to my Core support students (at least ONCE A WEEK!)

" Extended time on accommodations is not Endless time."

  1. You must negotiate with each teacher for each assignment. for 'more time'.
  2. This includes no ‘ambushing’ the teacher, as in announcing, on the due date, that you need more time.
  3. You should have a good idea that you are not going to finish and negotiate WHEN you will be done.
  4. When you approach the teacher you should have EVIDENCE (drafts, partially typed materials, printed out research, etc.) that you have indeed been working on the assignment. 
  5. You must both agree on the date when you will be done.  I suggest you document your agreement with a  Loop mail system email as confirmation.
CORE SUPPORT Locker